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the Seventeenth Century’s Scientific Revolution.

Structural engineers often work alongside civil engineers and architects as part of a construction team. “In a nutshell,” according to the Institution of Structural Engineers, “if a structure was a human body, then the architect would be concerned with the body shape and appearance, and the structural engineer would be concerned with the skeleton and sinews.” 

Structures must be able to deal with the conditions in which they are built. A house in Canada must have a roof that can bear the weight of heavy snow and a stadium in California must be able to withstand earthquakes, for example. When building bridges, designers must take into account the conditions of terrain, wind, water and traffic volume. Structural engineers consider all of these factors and provide technical advice about the project.

“Structural engineers battle gravity, wind, snow and rain every day to provide the world with outstanding structures,” Kate Leighton, a structural engineer, said in “Careers in Structural Engineering, a publication of the Institution of Structural Engineers. “They are experts at solving problems, meeting challenges and providing creative solutions.”

Structural engineers “design roof framing (beams, rafters, joists, trusses), floor framing (floor decks, joists, beams, trusses, girders), arches, columns, braces, frames, foundations and walls,” according to the National Council of Structural Engineers Association. “In bridges, they design the deck — or riding surface, girders or stringers, and piers. The materials they use include steel, concrete, wood, masonry, and aluminum. Engineers design the structure to resist forces from gravity, earthquakes, high winds, water, soil, collisions and blast explosions.”