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segregation and independent assortment

Mendel’s Principle of segregation
In order to explain the consistency of his F2 results (3 dominant: 1 recessive), Mendel suggested that the ‘particles’ (again, we call them alleles) must segregate during the production of gamete cells (i.e. sperm and egg). The resulting gametes therefore have only one allele from each parent. Further, he suggested that a gamete must have an equal probability (50%) of acquiring one allele vs. the other. This became known as the principle of segregation. Using the principle of segregation along with a simple technique developed by R. C. Punnett years after Mendel’s work, we can easily determine the ratios of phenotypes and genotypes predicted by Mendel’s particulate inheritance hypothesis resulting from controlled crosses starting from pure lines.

Results from Mendel’s experiments: segregation and independent assortment
Results from Mendel’s experiments: segregation and independent assortment