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Religion in the light of the Perennial Philosophy.

In 1964, during a trip to India, Smith stayed in a Gyuto Tibetan Buddhist monastery. During his visit he heard the monks chanting and realized that each individual was producing a chord, composed of a fundamental note and overtones. He returned to record the chanting in 1967 and asked acoustic engineers at MIT analyze the sound.[15] They confirmed the finding, which is an example of overtone singing. Smith has called this the singular empirical discovery of his career. The recording was released as an LP titled Music of Tibet,[16][17]and later released on CD. Royalties from the sales go to support the Gyuto Tantric University.[18]

Community engagement[edit]

Brandon Williamscraig and Huston Smith conducted their first community dialogue at Epworth United Methodist Church in Berkeley, CA.

Throughout his career, Smith made himself available to the communities where he resided. Toward the end of his life, while living in Berkeley, California, he participated in the Pacific Coast Theological Society at the Graduate Theological Union. He also attended local churches, including Trinity United Methodist, First Congregational Church, and Epworth United Methodist. On the occasion of publishing Tales of Wonder, in 2009 he co-convened “community conversations” at Epworth, during which he responded to questions about his life and work.[19][20]

Awards[edit]

For his lifelong commitment to bringing the world’s religions together to promote understanding, social justice and peace, Smith received the Courage of Conscience Award from the Peace Abbey in Sherborn, Massachusetts.[21]

Smith was named to be one of the first recipients of the Order of Universal Interfaith and Universal Order of Sannyasa’s Interfaith-Interspiritual Sage Award in January 2010. He received the award at his home on February 23, 2010.[22]

The Pacific Coast Theological Society celebrated “the lifetime of achievements of Professor Emeritus Huston Smith by considering the relationship between theology, mythology, and science” in a special session in 2012.[23] In 2015, the society presented Smith with their Codron Prize for The World’s Religions.[24]