Email: support@essaywriterpros.com
Call Us: US - +1 845 478 5244 | UK - +44 20 7193 7850 | AUS - +61 2 8005 4826

potential increase work efficiency.

Common Business Organizational Structures

1. Hierarchical Organizational Structure

Organizations that use a traditional hierarchical structure rely on a vertical chain of command as the prime method of organizing employees and their responsibilities. Military, government, and other very large organizations use a hierarchy to determine the level of control employees have over their work as well as their rank relative to others.

Hierarchical structures typically feature multiple layers of management and are therefore prone to bureaucracy and the creation of silos that prevent cross-team collaboration.

2. Matrix Organizational Structure

A matrix structure provides for reporting levels both horizontally as well as vertically. Employees may be part of a functional group (i.e. engineer) but may serve on a team that supports new product development (i.e. new album). This kind of structure may have members of different groups working together to develop a new product line.

For example, a recording engineer who works for a music publisher, may have engineers who report to him but may also use his expertise and work with teams to develop new music albums.

The advantage of a matrix organizational structure is that employees have responsibility not only for their department but for organizational projects. A challenge with this type of structure presents itself when employees are given direction from two different managers and they need to prioritize their work responsibilities.