Policies addressing child abuse and neglect?

Protecting children from abuse and neglect is a cornerstone of the social work profession. Social work professionals strive to ensure that children grow into healthy, well-developed adults. They also develop, implement, and evaluate policy initiatives regarding child welfare. Such initiatives should aim to not only reduce child abuse and neglect, but also provide support for children’s development and resources that will enhance their well-being. As a social worker, to what extent do you understand the existing policies addressing child abuse and neglect? In addition, how prepared are you to propose new policy initiatives in this regard?

For this Discussion, review the resources, including the NASW’s policy statement on child abuse and neglect on the NASW website. Pick one of the NASW positions and consider a policy initiative you would introduce to further that initiative. Be sure to think about the policies that already exist in your state and how this initiative might alter existing policies.

By Day 3

Post a brief description of the position you selected from the NASW policy statement on child abuse and neglect. Then, describe a policy initiative you might introduce to further that position. Finally, describe the policies that already exist in your state and explain how your initiative might alter these existing policies.

Support your post with specific references to the resources.

By Day 5

Read a selection of your colleagues’ posts.

Respond to at least two colleagues who selected a different position from the one you selected by suggesting how the policy initiative can be achieved. Be sure to identify any challenges or obstacles you see in passing and implementing the initiative.

Required Readings

NASW. (2009). Social work speaks. Washington, DC: NASW Press.
Child Abuse and Neglect (pp. 42–48)

Child Welfare Information Gateway. (n.d.) Laws & policies. Retrieved from https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/laws-policies/

The Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2013). Kids count data center. Retrieved from http://www.datacenter.kidscount.org

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