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Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

The translation of the 100 English IPIP items into Croatian proved to be an easy task. The two independent translations were nearly identical in over 90% of the cases, with differences between the two translations reflecting just different word orders. In the remaining cases (less than 10%), differences in the item translations reflected only different stylistical expressions by the two translators, with the exact same meaning in all cases. Naturally, the back translations were also all nearly perfect. A final item refinement was provided by a language editor, which is a standard practice before publishing tests in Croatia. We approached the participants in the self-report sample at the beginning of the academic year and asked them to participate in the study. We instructed them to describe themselves as accurately as possible using the inventories we described previously. We also instructed these participants to select the person who “knows them best.” Those acquaintances were asked to describe the target person using the same measures, which we then adapted for peer ratings (third person). RESULTS Factor Structure of the 100 IPIP Items Self-reports. When we extracted principal components from the correlations among the 100 IPIP items in the selfreport data set, there was a clear discontinuity in the sizes of the eigenvalues between the fifth and the sixth factors. Figure 1 presents a plot of the first 15 eigenvalues. The factor loadings from a varimax rotation of these self-reports are provided in Appendix 1. The five factors explained 41.6% of the total variance. Of the 100 items, 94 (94%) loaded FIGURE 1. Plot of the eigenvalues in the four data sets: Selfreports and peer ratings on 100 items. as expected based on the original findings in an American community sample (Goldberg, 2005). Of the 20 items defining the Extraversion factor, all loaded most highly on the same factor. For the factors of Emotional Instability and Intellect, 19 items loaded most highly on the same factor. For the factors of Agreeableness and Conscientiousness, 18 loaded as expected. In total, only 6 items departed from the intended structure, 1 of which had no substantial loadings on any of the factors (“Am always prepared,” which was intended to measure the positive pole of Conscientiousness). The item “Am interested in people,” which was intended as a measure of the positive pole of Agreeableness, loaded most highly on the positive pole of Extraversion. The item “Am hard to get to know,” intended as a measure of the negative pole of Agreeableness, loaded most highly on the negative pole of Extraversion. The item “Pay attention to details,” intended as a measure of the positive pole of Conscientiousness, loaded most highly on the positive pole of Intellect. The item “Get overwhelmed by emotions,” intended as a measure of the negative pole of Emotional Stability, loaded most highly on the positive pole of Agreeableness. Finally, the item “Avoid difficult reading material,” intended as a measure of the negative pole of Intellect, loaded most highly on the negative pole of Conscientiousness with almost the same size of loading as on the intended factor. Because the majority of the items for the domain of Emotional Stability are oriented toward the negative pole (75% for the long form and 80% for the short form), the resulting factor from the analysis was also oriented toward the negative pole. Therefore, we labeled it as ES-, or Emotional Instability