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Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis.

Behavioral Therapy: When behaviorism became a more prominent school of thought during the early part of the twentieth-century, techniques such as different types of conditioning began to play an important role in psychotherapy. While behaviorism may not be as dominant as it once was, many of its methods are still very popular today. Behavioral therapy often uses classical conditioningoperant conditioning, and social learning to help clients alter problematic behaviors.
Humanistic Therapy: Starting in the 1950s, the school of thought known as humanistic psychology began to have an influence on psychotherapy. The humanist psychologist Carl Rogers developed an approach known as client-centered therapy, which focused on the therapist showing unconditional positive regard to the client. Today, aspects of this approach remain widely used. The humanistic approach to psychotherapy focuses on helping people maximize their potential. Such approaches tend to stress the importance of self-exploration, free will, and self-actualization.

Cognitive Therapy: The cognitive revolution of the 1960s also had a major impact on the practice of psychotherapy, as psychologists began to increasingly focus on how human thought processes influence behavior and functioning. Cognitive therapy is centered on the idea that our thoughts have a powerful influence on our mental well-being. For example, if you tend to see the negative aspects of every situation, you will probably have a more pessimistic outlook and a gloomier overall mood. The goal of cognitive therapy is to identify the cognitive distortions that lead to this type of thinking and replace such thoughts with more realistic and positive ones. By doing so, people are able to improve their moods and overall well-being.