Email: support@essaywriterpros.com
Call Us: US - +1 845 478 5244 | UK - +44 20 7193 7850 | AUS - +61 2 8005 4826

A symbolic fiction story.

NameDefinitionExample
AllegoryA symbolic fiction story.C. S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a religious allegory with Aslan as Christ and Edmund as Judas.[4]
AlliterationRepeating the same letter or consonant sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.In the film V for Vendetta the main character performs a couple of soliloquies with a heavy use of alliteration, e.g., “Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished, as the once vital voice of the verisimilitude now venerates what they once vilified. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified, and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose vis-à-vis an introduction, and so it is my very good honor to meet you and you may call me V.”
Amplification (rhetoric)Amplification refers to a literary practice wherein the writer embellishes the sentence by adding more information to it in order to increase its worth and understanding.E.g., Original sentence: The thesis paper was difficult. After amplification: The thesis paper was difficult: it required extensive research, data collection, sample surveys, interviews and a lot of fieldwork.
AnagramRearranging the letters of a word or a phrase to form a new phrase or word.E.g., An anagram for “debit card” is “bad credit”. As you can see, both phrases use the same letters. By mixing the letters a bit of humor is created.
AsyndetonWhen sentences do not use conjunctions (e.g., and, or, nor) to separate clauses, but run clauses into one another, usually marking the separation of clauses with punctuation.An example is when John F. Kennedy said on January 20, 1961 “…that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.”
BathosAn abrupt transition in style from the exalted to the commonplace, producing a ludicrous effect. While often unintended, bathos may be used deliberately to produce a humorous effect.[5][6]: The ballerina rose gracefully en pointe and extended one slender leg behind her, like a dog at a fire hydrant.(Jennifer Hart, Arlington)[7]